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License fees for using certain image/video formats in your apps?

Martin8Martin8 Posts: 24New Users @
If an app uses GIF, JPEG, MPEG, etc. compression for photos/videos is it legal to use these and similar standards in commercial apps? Or do developers who use these formats in their apps have to pay license fees to the inventors/copyright/patent holders of these formats?

Replies

  • dev666999dev666999 Posts: 3,621New Users @ @ @ @ @
    Did you take the photos yourself? No problems

    Did you buy the photos from a stockhouse? No problems

    Did you lift the images from a Google search? That would be a copyright infringement. However the odds on getting caught are slim to none.

  • sparksosparkso Posts: 554Registered Users @ @ @
    edited October 12
    dev666999 wrote: »
    Did you take the photos yourself? No problems

    Did you buy the photos from a stockhouse? No problems

    Did you lift the images from a Google search? That would be a copyright infringement. However the odds on getting caught are slim to none.

    I think he is talking about compression standards. Not content.
  • Martin8Martin8 Posts: 24New Users @
    edited October 12
    sparkso wrote: »
    I think he is talking about compression standards. Not content.

    Exactly. I'm not talking about using images, but using technologies like GIF, JPEG, MPEG compression etc. in your commercial app. Is it allowed or do you have to pay the inventors/copyright/patent holders of these technologies a license fee?

    E.g. if you have an app that allows users to edit images/videos and uses GIF, JPEG, MPEG etc. to save the images/videos they edited.
  • dev666999dev666999 Posts: 3,621New Users @ @ @ @ @
    Martin8 wrote: »
    sparkso wrote: »
    I think he is talking about compression standards. Not content.

    Exactly. I'm not talking about using images, but using technologies like GIF, JPEG, MPEG compression etc. in your commercial app. Is it allowed or do you have to pay the inventors/copyright/patent holders of these technologies a license fee?

    E.g. if you have an app that allows users to edit images/videos and uses GIF, JPEG, MPEG etc. to save the images/videos they edited.

    You won't have any problems with that.
  • Martin8Martin8 Posts: 24New Users @
    dev666999 wrote: »
    You won't have any problems with that.

    Thanks. Could you maybe also explain why this won't cause any problems? Does Apple already pay license fees to the patent holders of these technologies for using them on the iPhone?

    Thank you!
  • Crichton333Crichton333 Posts: 278Registered Users @ @
    Martin8 wrote: »
    Does Apple already pay license fees to the patent holders of these technologies for using them on the iPhone?

    Who are the patent holders of GIF and JPEG ?
    "Smoke me a kipper i'll be back for breakfast." -- iOS: Nebula Virtual Reality
  • Martin8Martin8 Posts: 24New Users @
    edited October 17
    Who are the patent holders of GIF and JPEG ?

    I don't know, but there must be a company that holds the patent on such technologies.
  • dev666999dev666999 Posts: 3,621New Users @ @ @ @ @
    Martin8 wrote: »
    Who are the patent holders of GIF and JPEG ?

    I don't know, but there must be a company that holds the patent on such technologies.

    You answer is here...

    In August 1999, Unisys changed the details of their licensing practice, announcing the option for owners of certain non-commercial and private websites to obtain licenses on payment of a one-time license fee of $5000 or $7500.[36] Such licenses were not required for website owners or other GIF users who had used licensed software to generate GIFs. Nevertheless, Unisys was subjected to thousands of online attacks and abusive emails from users believing that they were going to be charged $5000 or sued for using GIFs on their websites.[37] Despite giving free licenses to hundreds of non-profit organizations, schools and governments, Unisys was completely unable to generate any good publicity and continued to be condemned by individuals and organizations such as the League for Programming Freedom who started the "Burn All GIFs" campaign in 1999.[38][39]

    The United States LZW patent expired on 20 June 2003.[40] The counterpart patents in the United Kingdom, France, Germany and Italy expired on 18 June 2004, the Japanese patents expired on 20 June 2004, and the Canadian patent expired on 7 July 2004.[40] Consequently, while Unisys has further patents and patent applications relating to improvements to the LZW technique,[40] GIF may now be used freely.[41]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GIF
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