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Newby to iOS requests help

jmccownjmccown OklahomaPosts: 11New Users *
Hello:

I am an Android developer looking to enhance my skills by branching out to iOS. Was wondering if any of you could give me some advice?

Up to this point the only apple device I have ever owned is an old iPod touch. I hear I need a Mac to develop iOS Apps. Is this absolutely 100% necessary?

I understand Object-oriented programming well. And I programmed in C on Windows PCs way back when. Any advice on getting up to speed with Objective-C/Swift?

I am thinking the best way to get going would be to start by translating my published Android Apps to iOS. Is that a good way to start?

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Replies

  • RussellLowryRussellLowry Posts: 24New Users @
    Welcome!

    Yes, it is absolutely necessary to have a Mac to develop for iOS. To be able to to run Xcode (the IDE), you must have a Mac.

    Your Android app I assume is in Java, so if I were you, I would translate your previous Android apps into iOS. I know Java very well and find Objective-C quite easy to grab ahold of.

    Good luck!
  • dev666999dev666999 Posts: 3,554New Users @ @ @ @ @
    Welcome!

    Yes, it is absolutely necessary to have a Mac to develop for iOS. To be able to to run Xcode (the IDE), you must have a Mac.

    Your Android app I assume is in Java, so if I were you, I would translate your previous Android apps into iOS. I know Java very well and find Objective-C quite easy to grab ahold of.

    Good luck!

    Are you 100% sure of that? LOL...
  • jmccownjmccown OklahomaPosts: 11New Users *
    Hi Russell:

    Thanks for your response. I'm looking at Macs online. Would the following MacBook Air configuration be adequate for most iOS development projects?

    1.6 GHz i5 processor
    4 GB SDRAM
    128 GB Flash Storage

    Or do I need more horsepower?

    Also, if you or anyone else reading this have done any Android development on a Mac, would such a configuration work well for running Android Studio?

    Thanks
  • C6Silver05C6Silver05 SeattlePosts: 632New Users @ @ @
    4GB of RAM is not enough. 8GB is your minimum. The rest will work fine. Obviously the more power the better but the RAM is the key when it comes to Xcode in my experience.

    I have used Android Studio on the PC. If I translate to the MAC I would suggest your issue will be with the emulator (versus Xcode which has an simulator). The emulator is a pig as you know and so memory is key here. Once it is up and running though it seems to work fine. The initial load is a pain and when you see how quick the iOS simulator is you will cry tears of joy. You will also rejoice over how much better Xcode is although Android Studio is itself worlds better than Eclipse.

    As for learning I would highly suggest you check out Stanford's free iOS training on iTunes U. This is an actual course that is taught at Stanford and recorded for our viewing pleasure. Paul Hegarty, the professor, is in my opinion the absolute best of the best. Simon Allardice on Lynda.com is also good but not free.

  • baja_yubaja_yu San FranciscoPosts: 6,215Moderators, Registered Users Admin
    Beef up RAM. Definitely go with SSD storage.

    Mac will work well for Android too. Android Studio is OK, but you can also use plain IntelliJ on which it's based on. Community edition is free. If you're doing Android development, it might be worth springing for Genymotion too. Using IntelliJ will make it an easy switch for iOS if you use AppCode instead of Xcode, which I wholeheartedly suggest. It's not free but worth every (Euro)cent.
  • dev666999dev666999 Posts: 3,554New Users @ @ @ @ @
    jmccown wrote: »
    Hello:

    I am an Android developer looking to enhance my skills by branching out to iOS. Was wondering if any of you could give me some advice?

    Up to this point the only apple device I have ever owned is an old iPod touch. I hear I need a Mac to develop iOS Apps. Is this absolutely 100% necessary?

    I understand Object-oriented programming well. And I programmed in C on Windows PCs way back when. Any advice on getting up to speed with Objective-C/Swift?

    I am thinking the best way to get going would be to start by translating my published Android Apps to iOS. Is that a good way to start?

    Any help will be greatly appreciated.


    What are the specs of your current PC?
  • jmccownjmccown OklahomaPosts: 11New Users *
    C6Silver05 wrote: »
    4GB of RAM is not enough. 8GB is your minimum. The rest will work fine. Obviously the more power the better but the RAM is the key when it comes to Xcode in my experience.

    I have used Android Studio on the PC. If I translate to the MAC I would suggest your issue will be with the emulator (versus Xcode which has an simulator). The emulator is a pig as you know and so memory is key here. Once it is up and running though it seems to work fine. The initial load is a pain and when you see how quick the iOS simulator is you will cry tears of joy. You will also rejoice over how much better Xcode is although Android Studio is itself worlds better than Eclipse.

    As for learning I would highly suggest you check out Stanford's free iOS training on iTunes U. This is an actual course that is taught at Stanford and recorded for our viewing pleasure. Paul Hegarty, the professor, is in my opinion the absolute best of the best. Simon Allardice on Lynda.com is also good but not free.

    Thanks C6Silver, I will get at least 8GB for my Mac.

    Like you say, Android emulators are slow as molasses. I don't use them at all on my PCs unless its an App that uses SQLite and I need an easy way to look at the files created by the App. That can be difficult if you don't have a rooted device.

    I will check out the Stanford course on iOS. Thanks for the suggestion.
  • jmccownjmccown OklahomaPosts: 11New Users *
    dev666999 wrote: »

    What are the specs of your current PC?

    I have a three year old Dell laptop. I'm in the process of updating it to Windows 10. I had to update to 8.1 first. LOL. It runs Eclipse well. I will get Studio next.

    My other PC is an ancient Dell desktop running Vista. I have Studio on it, but it doesn't run very well.

    My next purchase after the MacBook will be a new Windows desktop. Any suggestions? I'm not as fond of Dell as I used to be.


  • jmccownjmccown OklahomaPosts: 11New Users *
    edited September 2015
    Alrighty, I got my MacAir Book and have started on the Standford iOs course on iTunes.

    I like the MacAir, although its going to take me some time to get going with all the differences from the Windows machines. I got an 11-inch and its somewhat difficult to read. So I set the screen density to make the stuff as big as possible. As you guys recommended, I got the 8 Gig of Ram. I decided to go with the basic i5 with 128 GBytes flash drive. I love the way it boots up quickly.

    The iOS simulators available on xCode are magnificent! I like Hegarty's course so far. He goes a bit fast for me, but I can always rewind and replay.

    So far, so good. I will need to get a simple utility ready for a client in iOS soon. Nothing fancy but it needs to be able to read/write xml files on a remote server.
  • C6Silver05C6Silver05 SeattlePosts: 632New Users @ @ @
    jmccown wrote: »
    I got an 11-inch and its somewhat difficult to read. So I set the screen density to make the stuff as big as possible.

    You can also consider doing a remote desktop from your PC to the Mac. This will allow you to use your regular screen(s) as well as a full sized keyboard/mouse. I've done this for year with the Mac Mini I use for development. I have multiple monitors on my PC/Win setup so this lets me multitask nicely. I use VNC Viewer which is free.

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