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Isometric Graphic question?

ziweiziwei Posts: 7New Users
edited June 2012 in iOS SDK Game Development
I just wondering, is this image is isometric?
1_Office%20Layout%20Plan.jpg
If yes, how can i create an similar image by using Tiled (isometric)?
If no, how can i create it and it can flexible with Cocos2d?
Thanks!:)
Post edited by ziwei on

Replies

  • LevyMastLevyMast Posts: 107Registered Users
    edited June 2012
    ziwei wrote: »
    I just wondering, is this image is isometric?If yes, how can i create an similar image by using Tiled (isometric)?
    If no, how can i create it and it can flexible with Cocos2d?
    Thanks!:)

    It's not isometric. It just a perspective view taken from above.
    It looks like Google Sketchup.
  • mistergreen2011mistergreen2011 Posts: 196Registered Users @ @
    edited June 2012
    Isometric projection - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    It's also where perspective lines will never meet.
    Oh, each tile would be an isometric square instead on a regular square.
  • ShiroboiShiroboi Posts: 16Registered Users
    I'd second LevyMast's comment. Looks like a 3D rendering in Sketchup. A good idea of a tile based view at that angle would be the classic Legend of Zelda series. There's lots of tutorials out there for creating such a view. Also, almost every 8 and 16bit Japanese RPGs have similar look, Pokemn, Final Fantasy, etc. it's probably the most common type of tiles.
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  • tetrisleetetrislee Posts: 21New Users
    Hello,
    You should work out your isometric transform; that is, you should have a transform that tells you from the original coordinates, where something is on the isometric projection. For example, an isometric projection might be something like ((isox = x + (y / 2)), (isoy = y)) (just a crappy example). From this equation, you can take your "normal-ville" x and y coordinates, and figure out your projection from that. As a caution, you may need to manually adjust the m34 component of the transform to prevent perspective effects from taking place.
    Thanks :)
  • celtic_sadnessceltic_sadness Terrassa (Barcelona-Spain)Posts: 1New Users Noob
    edited February 2015
    Isometric 2.5D rendering is more complex than explained.
    In my youtube channel you can watch:
    https://www.youtube.com/user/masteroldfield
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