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iOS vs. Android rankings differences

ethanwaethanwa Orlando, FLPosts: 725Registered Users @ @ @
Hi everyone -

I know many of you now have your apps on both platforms, as do I. I am finding that with iOS I am ranking fairly well and am earning roughly $100/day with my apps (I actually make a lot more than that, but I'm talking about a specific subset of apps I have). These are unique high-quality apps (not games) that many of my users find useful, not junk/spam apps, guides, ringtones, emoji, or any of that garbage.

With Android I am very low ranked and am lucky to make $5/day. Note that these apps are IDENTICAL to the iOS versions. I noticed that I am having a lot more trouble getting visibility.

My question is to people who are successful with iOS AND Android apps: How did you do it? What are some of the key differences to getting downloads and purchases between the two platforms? Any recommendations for a struggling Android dev who's been successful on iOS?

Thanks,

Ethan

Replies

  • PlutoPrimePlutoPrime Posts: 351Registered Users @ @
    edited May 2013
    The demographic on Android is generally two types: 1. Poor people who got a cheap phone for free because the guys at the carrier store told them what they should get 2. The nerds who think they have life figured out with their shitty customizations of crappy plastic hardware and that they're some how "POWER" USERS (whatever the **** that means...).

    This demographic happens to be the demo who wants to 1. Have full featured apps 2. Have no Ads in these apps 3. Not have to pay to acquire these apps.

    As a result: 1. Advertisers don't care much for Android users and Brand advertisers don't pay you much for showing ads to Android users, 2. Your paid apps won't sell that well because Android users are cheap entitled folk who think Programming is done by Hippies on Linux Boxes in their Mom's basements, or by happy elves in the North Pole.

    Google is dellusional to think that the Android market will compete in user value with the Apple App Store. The only thing that Android has on its side is volume. A shit ton of cheap-ass, poor, entitled users with a huge diversity of shitty buggy devices that you have to QA for.
  • dev666999dev666999 Posts: 3,558New Users @ @ @ @ @
    with iTunes sucking as bad as it has lately, I am converting my apps to Android.

    But have yet to upload my first.

    Your posts are depressing me :(
  • ethanwaethanwa Orlando, FLPosts: 725Registered Users @ @ @

    The demographic on Android is generally two types....

    As much as I agree with pretty much everything you said about Android users, it didn't answer my question. I know for a FACT that some of my competitors are making money ($100+ dollars a day) on a single Android app, so the market isn't THAT filled with deadbeats.
  • ShelShockShelShock Posts: 128Registered Users @ @

    The demographic on Android is generally two types: 1. Poor people who got a cheap phone for free because the guys at the carrier store told them what they should get 2. The nerds who think they have life figured out with their shitty customizations of crappy plastic hardware and that they're some how "POWER" USERS (whatever the **** that means...)..

    @PlutoPrime best post ever.
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  • felipewatanabefelipewatanabe São Paulo / BrazilPosts: 152Registered Users @ @
    edited May 2013

    The demographic on Android is generally two types: 1. Poor people who got a cheap phone for free because the guys at the carrier store told them what they should get 2. The nerds who think they have life figured out with their shitty customizations of crappy plastic hardware and that they're some how "POWER" USERS (whatever the **** that means...).

    This demographic happens to be the demo who wants to 1. Have full featured apps 2. Have no Ads in these apps 3. Not have to pay to acquire these apps.

    As a result: 1. Advertisers don't care much for Android users and Brand advertisers don't pay you much for showing ads to Android users, 2. Your paid apps won't sell that well because Android users are cheap entitled folk who think Programming is done by Hippies on Linux Boxes in their Mom's basements, or by happy elves in the North Pole.

    Google is dellusional to think that the Android market will compete in user value with the Apple App Store. The only thing that Android has on its side is volume. A shit ton of cheap-ass, poor, entitled users with a huge diversity of shitty buggy devices that you have to QA for.

    It is pretty much like what @PlutoPrime wrote. We've been struggling to get better exposure, downloads and revenue from Android, but it is still nowhere near the App Store grade.

    Recently we had a game doing well on Google Play with several thousands of downloads a day on Google Play (not to count the thousands of downloads from other "stores"). Fact is that it is too hard to monetize from Android and if you don't make it to dozens of thousands of downloads a day you are hardly going to make a good buck from there.

    A week later the same game started doing very well on iOS and now it pays a day what the Android version pays a month.
    Head of Marketing at Tapps Games
  • felipewatanabefelipewatanabe São Paulo / BrazilPosts: 152Registered Users @ @
    About the differences, we can tell that Android can be very very fast to push something to the top rankings if users get to find it and like it. If you do a good SEO work (writing a good description, translating it, uploading every promotional graphic, linking a game play video, creating links on forums and sites that lead to your app page on Google Play and so on) you are going to drive some considerable traffic to your game or app.

    One of our biggest problems is the traffic that comes from China and out of Play Store. Last week we had over 60.000 downloads in one day for a single app that literally paid cents from our banners and interstitial ads. Many Android users block ads and advertisers are not willing to pay for installs from China.
    Head of Marketing at Tapps Games
  • scottwbscottwb Posts: 952New Users @ @ @
    I'll chime in, our first app Gem Collapse 2 went on the Android and Amazon app stores last week. We have done ZERO marketing, just let it find its own level.

    After first week we have had > 9,000 downloads with a 50% retain rate. We have IAP and Chartboost ads.
    IAP is waste of time - as already said - Android users don't spend money.
    They do seem to click on ads though, $160 in first week. And this is with Android advertisers paying much less than iOS advertisers. If we were getting same CPI as iOS Gem Collapse then I think it would be more like $300.

    some things I did do:
    - good video demo of the game
    - I carefully worded all my game description to include as many other similar games as possible without being busted for keyword spam by Google Play. Android doesn't have keywords like Apple so your whole description forms the SEO.

    I am also pleased to see that people google+ the game - like sharing on your wall on Facebook.

    Next couple of days we will release a new version with Google Achievements and Leaderboards, I'm hoping this leads to some more organic downloads.

    The BIGGEST problem with Android apps is that your app will NOT work on a whole slew of devices and the users love to tell you this :) Why it doesn't work is a mystery because we tested on a whole bunch of different Android phones and tablets.

    Turning to Amazon - this is a slow burn and I'm not really expecting much TBH. I did email Amazon and asked them to feature our app - I'm still waiting ;-)


  • dev666999dev666999 Posts: 3,558New Users @ @ @ @ @
    What percentage IAP are you getting. I don't do advertising. So IAP is important to me.

    I am hoping you can give me the unlock number/download number percentage.

    For iOS mine is running 1-3.5 percent depending on the app.

    I have just started porting to Android, but haven't yet submitted anything.

    Your answer to the IAP unlock for Android will give me a better feel for continuing or abandoning the porting.
  • raymngraymng Posts: 2,015Registered Users @ @ @ @
    scottwb said:

    I'll chime in, our first app Gem Collapse 2 went on the Android and Amazon app stores last week. We have done ZERO marketing, just let it find its own level.

    After first week we have had > 9,000 downloads with a 50% retain rate. We have IAP and Chartboost ads.
    IAP is waste of time - as already said - Android users don't spend money.
    They do seem to click on ads though, $160 in first week. And this is with Android advertisers paying much less than iOS advertisers. If we were getting same CPI as iOS Gem Collapse then I think it would be more like $300.

    some things I did do:
    - good video demo of the game
    - I carefully worded all my game description to include as many other similar games as possible without being busted for keyword spam by Google Play. Android doesn't have keywords like Apple so your whole description forms the SEO.

    I am also pleased to see that people google+ the game - like sharing on your wall on Facebook.

    Next couple of days we will release a new version with Google Achievements and Leaderboards, I'm hoping this leads to some more organic downloads.

    The BIGGEST problem with Android apps is that your app will NOT work on a whole slew of devices and the users love to tell you this :) Why it doesn't work is a mystery because we tested on a whole bunch of different Android phones and tablets.

    Turning to Amazon - this is a slow burn and I'm not really expecting much TBH. I did email Amazon and asked them to feature our app - I'm still waiting ;-)


    Could you tell the Chartboost's eCPM compared to iOS?
    Thanks.
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